For the Dempseys, Different Dreams Signify Same MCS Roots

By Al Daniel

The Dempsey sisters have been bookending the BosWash megalopolis of late. The elder, Lucy Dempsey ’08, is a two-and-a-half-hour drive away from the nation’s capital, in her first year of law school at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia

Privy to the Magic

By Lisa Bohn, Office Manager

Before I started working at MCS in September, I was somewhat familiar with Maria Montessori and her teachings but had never been in a Montessori classroom myself.

Toddlers: Order Muppets or Chaos Muppets?

By Lindsay Porter, Toddler Teacher

A few years ago, a new theory of personality made a brief splash on the Internet: The Muppet Theory. Basically, it’s the premise that each of us is primarily an Order Muppet (rule-following, organized, risk-averse) or a Chaos Muppet (spontaneous, emotional, a bit volatile).

Is It Friday Yet?

By Rochelle Hayes, Primary Teacher

Fridays are extra special days in our classroom. Students from the Adolescent Community visit us those mornings, and it’s hard to tell who’s more excited about it, our three to six-year-olds or the adolescents!

The Child Creates the Adult

By Jeff Kishpaugh, Upper Elementary Teacher

A central idea in Montessori education is that “the child creates the adult” – that is, that the child, through her/his work, is creating the adult that s/he will become.

The Elementary Capstone Year

By Keturah Russell, Assistant Head of School for Academic Programs and Support; Toddler, Primary, and Lower Elementary Program Director

At Montessori Community School sixth grade is the last year of the elementary program. Our accrediting agency, the American Montessori Society, endorses sixth grade as an important “capstone” year of developmental maturation.

UEL Mini Olympics

By Sabine Howe, Physical Education Specialist

One of the events particularly unique to MCS is our Upper Elementary (UEL) Mini Olympics.

Questions

By Leandra Merea Strope, Music Specialist

(I’m new here.)  Again and again, it happens — a student comes to me with a question, and then as I’m standing there trying to give her an answer, she turns and dreamily walks away, usually to the water fountain, completely oblivious to my attempt to address her concern.